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1921: New Blackfriars, Oxford

Blackfriars owes its presence in Oxford today largely to the vision and heroic efforts of Bede Jarrett OP.

Fr Bede’s vision for the refounding of the Oxford priory led him to fundraise in the USA, and it was a wealthy American widow, Charlotte Tytus, who was the greatest benefactor of the new Blackfriars. The Dominicans purchased three adjacent properties at 62–64 St Giles, which were mostly demolished, though a few parts were incorporated.

The foundation stone was laid by Cardinal Bourne, 383 years since the suppression of the previous priory and 700 years to the day since the friars first arrived in Oxford.

In 1970, Blackfriars was recognised by the University of Oxford as an ‘Institute of Higher Study’. Finally, in 1994, Blackfriars Hall was established as a ‘Permanent Private Hall’, enabling students to study here for Oxford undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.

1921: New Blackfriars, Oxford

Blackfriars owes its presence in Oxford today largely to the vision and heroic efforts of Bede Jarrett OP.

Fr Bede’s vision for the refounding of the Oxford priory led him to fundraise in the USA, and it was a wealthy American widow, Charlotte Tytus, who was the greatest benefactor of the new Blackfriars. The Dominicans purchased three adjacent properties at 62–64 St Giles, which were mostly demolished, though a few parts were incorporated.

The foundation stone was laid by Cardinal Bourne, 383 years since the suppression of the previous priory and 700 years to the day since the friars first arrived in Oxford.

In 1970, Blackfriars was recognised by the University of Oxford as an ‘Institute of Higher Study’. Finally, in 1994, Blackfriars Hall was established as a ‘Permanent Private Hall’, enabling students to study here for Oxford undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.

1931: Mission in Edinburgh

The Scottish Province of the Order was wiped out at the Reformation. It was not until the C20th that Dominican houses were established again from the English Province, starting with the sisters. In 1931 a small community made its home in the early Georgian townhouse of 24 George Square. The priory served from the outset as a spiritual home for Catholic students and academics.

1931: Mission in Edinburgh

The Scottish Province of the Order was wiped out at the Reformation. It was not until the C20th that Dominican houses were established again from the English Province, starting with the sisters. In 1931 a small community made its home in the early Georgian townhouse of 24 George Square. The priory served from the outset as a spiritual home for Catholic students and academics.

1938: Scholars in Cambridge

The medieval priory in Cambridge was founded in 1238 on a site now occupied by Emmanuel College. In 1938, the widowed Lay Dominican mother of Sebastian Bullough OP, Enrichetta Bullough, offered the friars a suburban villa on Buckingham Road. This became a place of study, a ‘house of writers’ such as Victor White OP,, both friend and critic of Carl Jung; Gerald Vann OP and Thomas Gilby OP, editor of the modern English and Latin version of Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae.

From 1980–99 the Priory was home not only to the friars but also a number of young laypeople, often graduate students, who for a year or more shared the friars’ daily life. For much of this period, the friars also had a close involvement with the Catholic Chaplaincy at Fisher House in Cambridge.

1938: Scholars in Cambridge

The medieval priory in Cambridge was founded in 1238 on a site now occupied by Emmanuel College. In 1938, the widowed Lay Dominican mother of Sebastian Bullough OP, Enrichetta Bullough, offered the friars a suburban villa on Buckingham Road. This became a place of study, a ‘house of writers’ such as Victor White OP,, both friend and critic of Carl Jung; Gerald Vann OP and Thomas Gilby OP, editor of the modern English and Latin version of Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae.

From 1980–99 the Priory was home not only to the friars but also a number of young laypeople, often graduate students, who for a year or more shared the friars’ daily life. For much of this period, the friars also had a close involvement with the Catholic Chaplaincy at Fisher House in Cambridge.